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Geological Phenomena


Melissani Lake

Melissani Lake

The Melissani Lake, a cave-lagoon, which is about 3km from Sami, was opened in to the public 1963. Prior to the cave opening to the public, many objects dating back to the late 4th and early 3rd century BC were found. The objects included a rectangular terracotta slab depicting Pan and three Nymphs, a rectangular plaque with a female figure which was identified as the Nymph Melissanthi, which are on display in the Archaeological Museum at Argostoli.

When walking down the tunnel you are faced by one of the most impressive sites in existence. One part of the cave's ceiling has collapsed into the lake, which resulted in an opening of 50m long and 30m wide. It is amazing that the sun's rays, depending on the time of day (mainly from 10.30 a.m. to 13.00 p.m.), change the colour of the lake's waters. This, in turn, gives different light effects on the walls of the cave.

Boats are used to ferry their passengers on the lake to see the uncovered area, after which they go round a small island with wild figs growing, continue inside the roofed section where stalactites can be seen on the walls of the cave. A spectacle well worth seeing


Drogarati Cave

Drogarati Cave

The Caves at Drogarati, thought to be around 150 million years old, were only discovered about 100 years ago but, the development of the caves started in the 1960s. Over the years earthquakes have caused damage and part of the roof collapsed. The stalactites and stalagmites are a site to behold when you consider they take so many millions of years to form. With its constantly cool temperature and excellent acoustics, concerts are often held there with audiences of up to 500 people.